Samuel P., age 27, English Channel


This morning I inquired for my boy, whether he was come well or no, and it was told me that he was well in bed.

My Lord called me to his chamber, he being in bed, and gave me many orders to make for direction for the ships that are left in the Downs, giving them the greatest charge in the world to bring no passengers with them, when they come after us to Scheveling Bay, excepting Mr. Edward Montagu, Mr. Thomas Crew, and Sir H. Wright.

Sir R. Stayner hath been here early in the morning and told my Lord, that my Lord Winchelsea understands by letters, that the Commissioners are only to come to Dover to attend the coming over of the King. So my Lord did give order for weighing anchor, which we did, and sailed all day.

In our way in the morning, coming in the midway between Dover and Calais, we could see both places very easily, and very pleasant it was to me that the further we went the more we lost sight of both lands.

In the afternoon at cards with Mr. North and the Doctor. There by us, in the Lark frigate, Sir R. Freeman and some others, going from the King to England, come to see my Lord and so onward on their voyage.

In the afternoon upon the quarterdeck the Doctor told Mr. North and me an admirable story called “The Fruitless Precaution,” an exceeding pretty story and worthy my getting without book when I can get the book.

This evening came Mr. Sheply on board, whom we had left at Deal and Dover getting of provision and borrowing of money.

In the evening late, after discoursing with the Doctor, &c., to bed.

*(The Diary of Samuel Pepys M.A. F.R.S., edited by Henry B. Wheatley F.S.A., London, George Bell & Sons York St. Covent Garden, Cambridge Deighton Bell & Co., 1893.)